Quire Cleveland makes life more harmonious by providing a vital connection to distant lands and ages past, through the human voice. Breathing life into choral music which may have lain silent for centuries, Quire reveals the timelessness and universal humanity of this art. Under the artistic direction of Ross W. DuffinQuire performs nine centuries of a cappella repertoire.

The Land of Harmony in Hudson

Meet us in “The Land of Harmony” — Quire Cleveland’s program of American music — to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the First Congregational Church of Hudson. You’ll hear early versions of The Star-Spangled Banner,” “When Jesus Wept,” “Amazing Grace — as well as lesser-known but equally inspiring works.
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Review: Quire Cleveland: “Song of Songs” at St. John’s Cathedral

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A program of twenty-one settings of poetry from a single source might seem to be much of a muchness, but Quire Cleveland’s concert “The Song of Songs: Medieval to Modern” on Friday evening at St. John’s Cathedral proved to be thoroughly varied, endlessly fascinating, and sung with style and total commitment.  Read more »

The Song of Songs: Choral Settings from Medieval to Modern
David Fallis, guest conductor

Quire Cleveland and esteemed guest conductor David Fallis present a special concert featuring the beautiful, evocative verses of the Bible’s Song of Songs. You’ll hear music by such masters as John Dunstable, Giovanni da Palestrina, Tomás Luis de Victoria, Heinrich Schütz, Edward Bairstow, and Healey Willan. Read more (2) »

Preview: Quire Cleveland to explore the Song of Songs in two concerts with guest conductor David Fallis

“Rise up, my love, my fair one, my dove, and come away. For, lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone; The flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, and the vines with the tender grape give a good smell.”

Those are welcome sentiments as we Northeast Ohioans continue to slide across the ice, slog through the drifts and wade through muddy puddles, but where do they come from? Read more »